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Treatment Rosacea

Rosacea is a chronic (long-term) disease that affects the skin and sometimes the eyes. The disorder is characterized by redness, pimples, and, in advanced stages, thickened skin. Rosacea usually affects the face; other parts of the upper body are only rarely involved.

Approximately 14 million people in the United States have rosacea. It most often affects adults between the ages of 30 and 60. Rosacea is more common in women (particularly during menopause) than men. Although rosacea can develop in people of any skin color, it tends to occur most frequently and is most apparent in people with fair skin.

Symptoms

Rosacea has many symptoms, including the following:

  • Frequent redness (flushing) of the face. Most redness is at the center of the face (forehead, nose, cheeks, and chin). There may also be a burning feeling and slight swelling.
  • Small red lines under the skin. These lines show up when blood vessels under the skin get larger. This area of the skin may be somewhat swollen, warm, and red.
  • Constant redness along with bumps on the skin. Sometimes the bumps have pus inside (pimples), but not always. Solid bumps on the skin may later become painful.
  • Inflamed eyes/eyelids.
  • A swollen nose. In some people (mostly men), the nose becomes red, larger, and bumpy.
  • Thicker skin. The skin on the forehead, chin, cheeks, or other areas can become thicker because of rosacea.
How Are the Eyes Affected?

Up to 50 percent of people who have rosacea get eye problems. Eyes can have redness, dryness, itching, burning, excess tears, and the feeling of having sand in the eye. The eyelids may become inflamed and swollen. The eyes may become sensitive to light, and the person may have blurred vision or some other kind of vision problem.

Causes

Doctors don't know the exact cause of rosacea. Some doctors think rosacea happens when blood vessels expand too easily, causing flushing. People who blush a lot may be more likely to get rosacea. It is also thought that people inherit the likelihood of getting the disease.

Though not well-researched, some people say that one or more of these factors make their rosacea worse:

  • Heat (including hot baths)
  • Heavy exercise
  • Sunlight
  • Winds
  • Very cold temperatures
  • Hot or spicy foods and drinks
  • Drinking alcohol
  • Menopause
  • Emotional stress
  • Long-term use of steroids on the face.

People with rosacea and pimples may think the pimples are caused by bacteria. But no one has found a clear link between rosacea and bacteria.

 

Reference:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, USA.